Category Archives: Case Study

How to Conquer Distance with Collaboration

WAPOLLong distance relationships are never easy. This is especially true of large-scale organizations which are housed in multiple and varied locations. Sometimes differing locations will have differing needs but more often they have similar struggles. Like the Western Australia Police.

The Western Australia Police recently began using IdeaScale as a method of conquering that distance; namely a distance that covers over 2.5 million square kilometers, including 11 districts and 197 police stations in both urban and rural areas. As a result of their Frontline 2020 initiative, the WAP feels more connected and collaborative than ever. The kilometers between are hardly noticeable with the centralized digital meeting spot to recommend better ways of working, solutions to problems, and collaborate with fellows—regardless of physical location. It also allows workers the opportunity to note the similarities amongst themselves, to realize that they are not as isolated as they might physically feel sometimes.

As Deputy Commissioner Steven Brown relayed, one of the best outcomes of Frontline 2020 has been the ability for all members of their workforce to have one central location to identify “the things that make it hard for them to get their jobs done,” things which the Deputy Commissioner says are often easy to fix once they are known. In essence, the program allows for everyone in the community to feel heard and respected in the process. Moreover, the WAP emphasizes their appreciation for the participation of their workforce by responding to every suggestion, and incentivizing with the possibility for small prizes.

In addition to a more engaged, collaborative workforce, the ideas coming from Frontline 2020 have already had a positive impact on the administrative and logistical side as well, saving thousands of hours of work time.

To find out more about the Western Australia Police and Frontline 2020, click here to download the recent case study.

One Weird Thing About Customer Satisfaction

customer satisfactionHere’s one weird thing about customer satisfaction: it may be that your employees have the key to improving it. After all, employees are the people who interact with customers on a day-to-day basis, and are most aware of common concerns amongst customers, as well as improvements that will have the biggest impact. Further, employees have knowledge of the structure and resources of the organization from the inside, so they are better equipped to recommend practical changes.

Banchile Inversiones, a Chilean management company that provides one of the largest mutual funds markets and stock brokerage businesses in the country, has firsthand experience with this phenomenon of employee feedback to improve customer satisfaction. Like many other companies, they had long welcomed employee input through antiquated systems like email and evaluations, but found those systems difficult to scale up. In an effort to continue to gather great ideas, and to ensure that employees felt heard, Banchile started using IdeaScale.

Perhaps their most effective strategy was the extensive planning and design surrounding the implementation of the innovation initiative. Not only did they have a system in place for gathering and evaluating ideas, they also created a comprehensive strategy to stimulate internal engagement. The latter is especially important when you are introducing a completely new feedback system within your company. Banchile had a three-pronged approach: a CEO announcement at annual company meeting; email with a link to the community to every employee; and a method of rewards for involvement.

In addition to this internal marketing approach, the team also responded to every idea that was put forth. Combined, these efforts impressed upon employees an appreciation of their input and incentive to continue to participate.

As a result, Banchile was able to identify five new projects through their first campaign that will help to improve customer satisfaction company-wide.

To read more about how Banchile Inversiones enacted their innovation campaigns, and about the five new projects which were implemented, download our recent case study here.

Innovations in Measuring and Managing Drug Addiction Treatment

NIDA-blogThe National Institute on Drug Addiction has issued an exciting new challenge that breaks the boundaries between research specialties to improve the quality of drug addiction treatment. The Challenge, including the official rules and submission criteria, can be seen here: http://nida.ideascale.com/

Group and individual submitters are competing for part of a $100,000 prize pool. “Innovations in Measuring and Managing Drug Addiction Treatment Quality” will accept white papers describing solutions up until June 1, 2015 at nida.ideascale.com. Once registered, individuals can utilize the Forum section of the site to build teams that expand the breadth of their knowledge and research background.

The white paper should describe:

•  Novel quality measurement and management system.

•  How the concepts behind this novel system could be used to improve the quality of addiction treatment.

•  The research or other gaps that need to occur for these quality improvements to be established.

•  How these new measurement and management systems might be evaluated.

This challenge is open to anyone, including experts and researchers familiar with as well as those outside of the field of drug addiction treatment. The mission of this Challenge is to expand the knowledge and research that goes into quality measurement and management for addiction treatment. Through Open Innovation, NIDA seeks novel ways to evaluate the quality of treatment so as to improve the evaluation system.

Why to Buy an Open Innovation Platform

cirtixAre you considering utilizing an open innovation platform within your organization? Are you planning to build that platform yourself?

Well, you might want to reconsider whether the decision to build your platform is the best one for you. A recent IdeaScale case study focused on Citrix, a multinational software company, which has had a company mandate in place since 2001 to gather internal and external new ideas.

After outgrowing the previous model of feedback via email, Citrix decided it made the most sense to implement an open innovation platform. Like many other organizations, Citrix had it in mind to build and use their own platform. It makes sense, right? They’re already a software company, and they surely have all of the skills needed in order to create something of that nature.

However, Citrix quickly realized that their company-built platform was not as feasible as they imagined; most notably, the costs of maintaining the system were much higher than anticipated. But Citrix was in luck, because they found IdeaScale and never looked back.

In addition to the cost-considerations, there are five other big reasons that it might make more sense to buy—rather than build—your open innovation platform:

1. Less time to market implementation.
2. IdeaScale provides the experts for troubleshooting and maintenance.
3. Greater agility to customize, and less time to do so.
4. Increased ability to scale up or down as needed.
5. Higher probability of polished and aesthetic end product.

What more do you need to convince you? You can read more about Citrix and their experience with IdeaScale in this recent case study.

Open Challenge: the National Institute on Drug Abuse is Innovating Addiction Treatment

NIDA-blogOpen Innovation is at its most powerful when used to discover new opportunities and new methods. The National Institute on Drug Abuse has set forth an open innovation Challenge to improve the quality of drug addiction treatment in this fashion. Offering a total prize pool of $100,000, NIDA calls on anyone, including researchers and experts, to present new systems and metrics for the measurement and management of drug addiction treatment quality.

Drug addiction is a disease that affects countless individuals in the United States and around the world. Innovative approaches that combine the latest science of addiction and its treatment with an understanding of how to motivate and manage quality improvement will enhance the treatment system’s ability to provide the best care possible.

Open Innovation is about breaking down barriers. That’s why NIDA is seeking participation not only from researchers in the field of drug addiction treatment, but also those with experience in other treatment fields and those specializing in quality measurement and management.

Submissions must outline a novel system for measuring and managing drug addiction treatment quality, identify the current state of research, and describe the research that would need to be done to fully realize their proposed system. Individuals are welcome to submit solutions, but NIDA encourages registrants to build a team and submit a group solution since the most complete solutions likely will draw upon knowledge from multiple fields. The Challenge, including the official rules and submission criteria, can be seen here: http://nida.ideascale.com/. Registrants can find collaborators and build diverse teams through the Forum page on the challenge site.

Advice about Open Innovation from Greektown-Casino

OIAwards2014IdeaScale is pleased to have completed another year of Open Innovation Awards. This year, we learned a lot about engagement, innovation metrics, and more from our winners and we invited one of our runners up to join us in an interview about their open innovation program: Lori Snetsinger from the Greektown Casino.

Located in the heart of Detroit’s premier entertainment district, the Greektown Casino-Hotel provides best-in-class gaming choices, exceptional accommodations and award-winning restaurants.

In 2014, the Greektown Casino-Hotel launched “The Cheese Factory” whose goal was to make all 1,500 casino team members feel like they were being heard. “The Cheese Factory” was an IdeaScale community where employees could share their great thoughts and ideas and tell ways to make their company better, while also addressing what needs to be fixed, what would make their jobs easier and what would make customers happier.

The casino formed an internal team called “The Mousetrap Team,” whose sole purpose was to serve this initiative.  This team was 100% responsible for moderating all of the ideas that were submitted.

Greektown Casino shares some additional insight here:

IdeaScale: How long have you been utilizing IdeaScale?
Greektown Casino: We received our first piece of “cheese” on May 16, 2014.

IS: Why is innovation vital to your organization?
GC: The Mousetrap Team’s philosophy is centered around being obsessed with finding a better way.  Our team members are out on the floor every day and know the property better than anyone.  We rely on our team members to provide us with game-changing ideas on how to make Greektown Casino-Hotel the best casino in Detroit!

IS: What’s the most important piece of advice that you can give to someone launching an IdeaScale community?
GC: The most important piece for us was getting the word out to all of our team members.  Less than 50% of our team here has a company email address, so we had custom business cards created that we handed out to every team member during our latest team member rallies.  The cards had the link to the Cheese Factory, as well as our email address to field any questions on the sign-up process.

IS: What are you most proud of in your innovation program?
GC: I think the biggest point of pride has been being able to give our team members a voice in the changes around the property.  Wooden suggestion boxes and verbal communication are great, but oftentimes those mediums lack follow-up.  “The Cheese Factory” allows team members to interact with the Mousetrap Team in a way where they feel their voices are truly being heard.  We respond to all ideas within 72 hours, and begin vetting the ideas with the business immediately.  We are relentless in our efforts to make sure our team members are in the loop for the entire process, and we think that gives everyone a real sense of ownership.

To learn more best practices from OI award winners visit http://ideascale.com/2014-open-innovation-awards/

What advice would you share? What else do you want to learn from OI Award winners?

Department of Labor: Solving Problems and Raising Awareness with National Dialogues

DOL-b&wThe United States Department of Labor is a cabinet-level department of the U.S. federal government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, re- employment services, and more.

ePolicyWorks is a special initiative launched by the Department of Labor which empowers web- based policymaking that engages citizens in order to address barriers to employment for people with disabilities and foster employment success of those living with disabilities. The initiative is also the award-winning host of an important series of online dialogues that enable ODEP to enlist the public’s input on key policy issues related to the employment of people with disabilities by channeling the brainpower of federal partners, nonprofits, NGOs and other stakeholders. IdeaScale is the platform for collaboration.

The Department of Labor has hosted more than seven online dialogues utilizing the IdeaScale platform. Each dialogue lasts approximately four weeks and follows an adaptable seven-step process.

After launching seven dialogues, the team is proud to report:

–     This strategy has won the ePolicyworks team recognition from the Secretary of Labor as part of their Honor Awards for the Federal Partners in Transition National Online Dialogue Team.
–     Over 5,000 community members have generated more than 600 ideas and 13,000 votes across all the dialogues.
–     Every state in the US has been represented across the challenges.
–     That the dialogues have improved policy efficiency substantially. A process that has traditionally taken five-years has been collapsed into a single year.

To learn about how the national dialogues have impacted policy and for a deeper understanding of the seven steps for a successful national dialogue, download the case study here.

Change My World in One Minute

WCPD14_Logo_USA_HRRight now 17 million people around the world are living with Cerebral Palsy. Of the children living with CP:

      •  1 in 4 cannot talk
      •  1 in 3 cannot walk
      •  1 in 2 have an intellectual disability
      •  1 in 4 have epilepsy

It’s inconceivable, right? Not to the those 17 million, and not the 350 million people who are close to an adult or child with CP. That enormous crowd is at the base of the World Cerebral Palsy Day challenge: Change My World in One Minute.

This challenge has four stages, making it easy for anyone – hopefully everyone – to participate. The challenge is simple: submit a written or video, that takes a minute or less to watch or read, idea for how to improve the lives of people with CP.

      •  Stage 1: Idea Submission and Most Creative Prizes
Anyone can submit: those with CP, the people who know and love them, innovators and experts. Ideas are accepted through the end of October 2014. Apple iPads will be given out to the most innovative and creative ideas as spot prizes.

      •  Stage 2: Voting and People’s Choice Award
Voting begins October 1st and ends October 31st 2014. The participant whose idea gets the most votes in October will win the People’s Choice $500 Award.

      •  Step 3: Judging
A panel of experts made up of innovation specialists, individuals with CP and family members will review all submitted ideas. Their short list will be publicized on January 20th, 2015.

      •  Step 4: Invent It
Inventors, researchers and innovators are all welcomed to create prototypes and designs of solutions to the short listed ideas. Winners of the $30,000 prize pool are announced on July 20th, 2015.

This is the 3rd Change My World Challenge issued. In years past winners thought up a solar powered wheelchair – that was built during the Invent It! stage and a customizable walker – built for function AND style. Idea submission is already open, and drawing some great ideas already, including a portable ramp, a preschool revamped to meet the needs of kids with CP, and some really inventive mobility concepts.

Participation on any level will help make the lives of those with CP easier, and more fulfilling. An idea, a vote, or even a social media share for this event will increase awareness, and grow the crowd of innovators. A $10,000 prize will be awarded to the non-profit organization with the most clients, family members, staff, and allies participating.

So get in there and submit your best ideas. Don’t forget to celebrate World CP Day on October 1st by wearing green, spreading the world, and returning to the community to vote for the most innovative, most exciting, most life changing ideas.

The City of Atlanta Leveraging Its Most Valuable Resource – Its Employees

When Barack Obama took office five years ago, he launched the White House SAVE Award – a program that sought ideas from federal employees about how to make the government not only more effective, but also more efficient when it came to spending (hence its name: “Securing Americans Value and Efficiency”).

Every year, the President issues a call to employees asking them to share their ideas using IdeaScale technology. Every branch across the US participates in the conversation and votes on one another’s ideas. Then, the Office of Management and Budget narrows down the best ideas to a “final four” which can be viewed and voted on by the American public. The winner is granted the honor of presenting his or her idea to the President in Washington. It has been a hugely successful program that has generated millions of dollars of savings on an ongoing basis.

In 2013, the City of Atlanta followed suit and instituted a city-wide campaign that engaged all Atlantian employees in generating ideas that could reduce waste, cut red tape and save money on operations. The city launched the program with a gala celebration that instructed employees on how to use the tool followed by ongoing, city-wide communications to all employees via email that encouraged them to submit ideas. They even had an offline option for employees who didn’t have access to a computer as part of their daily routine at work.

The campaign was celebrated as a success. They generated hundreds of ideas and from those hundreds, twelve were flagged for implementation, and the top three alone were evaluated to amount to a potential cost savings of $7.1 million annually.

If you want to learn more about the City of Atlanta’s crowdsourcing success, download the case study here.