5 Things to Consider When Launching a Crowdsourcing Campaign

btaylorThis article is a guest post by Bradley Taylor. Bradley Taylor is a freelance writer from Derby, England, UK who writes about all aspects of the automotive industry (among other subjects). You can connect with Bradley on Twitter and Google+.

Crowdsourcing campaigns are very effective for developing project attention; whether it is related to a business idea, personal interest, political statement, or something else. Here are five measures you should consider in order to host an effective crowdsourcing campaign.

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1. Your project objective

You need to be certain your idea is worth pursuing before commencing a crowdsourcing campaign. You need to carry out research to work out if your campaign will excite and interest a wide range of people. Has something similar already been done before? If something akin to your idea has already occurred, you need to work out how you can transform your idea into something unique which will help you be the signal in the noise. For example, if your project is related to the motoring industry, it is worth bearing in mind that other manufacturers such as Mazda and MG have offered incentives such as test drives for their products in order to generate publicity and consumer interest. Therefore, you would need to tailor your project to offer something extra and unique which these competitors have not yet attempted.

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2. Identify your market

If you cannot identify a sustainable and profitable target market to which you can direct your crowdsourcing campaign, then no one will participate in your project or buy your product. Identify a target market for your product or campaign and, if possible, tailor certain elements of your project or product to be more accessible towards your target market. Plan the presentation of your project to these prospective supporters, explaining why it would be beneficial for them to participate.

3. Appeal to your crowdsourcing community

Your crowdsourcing community is fundamental to the overall success of your enterprise. Analyze how different crowds react to your campaign idea and pay attention to the topics in which they appear most interested. All of this initial research is vital in order for you to engage relevant communities in your campaign. This will ensure you are targeting the right community for your project’s needs, and improves the chances of your initiative being remembered as unique and engaging. Your crowdsourcing community is the backbone of you campaign. If they are invested and captivated by your idea, they will help you generate a great deal of interest and thus exponentially improve both the publicity and profits of your campaign.

4. Continuous engagement with your supporters

A vast amount of crowdsourcing campaigns start out enthusiastically with an injection of interest from supporters, then only to fizzle out quickly which results in a failed campaign. In order for your campaign to succeed you need to capture supporter interest and then sustain it, keeping in regular contact with your supporters so that they are aware your campaign is still ongoing and so that they can become more engaged once more. This continued contact will convey to your supporters your emotional investment within your campaign, thus encouraging others to develop interest and excitement about your project and share it. This ongoing connection with your supporters elevates both its real world and online publicity, incorporating a vast audience into your project.

5. Capitalize upon social networks

Online social networking is the lifeblood of any crowdsourcing campaign. Create a website for your campaign and link it to all of your social networking sites; Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, even image based sites such as Instagram and Pinterest. By uniting all of your various social networking followers, you can generate a great deal of online traffic towards your campaign, thus massively increasing online awareness to, and subsequent interest in, your project.

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