Category Archives: IdeaScale

Beyond the Idea

image curtesy of firelknot via flickr.

image courtesy of firelknot via flickr

A great idea can be hard won or emerge in a moment. But the idea isn’t the end of the journey, it’s only the beginning. The ground between a great idea and a great success spans development, launch, and reception.

Google’s gmail took over three years to develop, it launched in beta eight years after it was first attempted. The early development, where it was used internally, and the beta stages accessible by invite only users, allowed google, a search site, to refine their new offering. It’s hard now to remember a time when the launch of gmail seemed questionable, but at the time of launch is was poised to be a breakthrough, or a miserable failure. From the search function to the massive storage, the free email functioned more as an app than its competitors’ website centered functionality. Every feature that set google apart represented a user preference. (Time)

An idea must have an audience, as 3M chemist Spencer Silver discovered. Silver discovered a mild adhesive, just strong enough to attach to an object, but weak enough for the bond to be broken, and then adhesive to still adhere to a new surface. Unfortunately, this discovery was made in the process of attempting to create new, stronger adhesives, so Silver’s discovery was officially shelved. Undeterred, Silver persisted in sharing his discovery with his coworkers and colleagues. The core idea of the adhesive became the post-it note when another 3M employee sought a way to get his bookmarks to stay in a book without falling out. (NPR)

The development phase is where an idea turns into a market worthy offering with strong value proposition. As valuable as this development is, a succinct template for refinement can improve time to market. On October 21st IdeaScale is broadcasting a complimentary webinar to introduce CO-STAR: a refinement template and new module within our innovation management tool. Guests from EDG, the creators of the CO-STAR method, and the BBC will present the template and share use cases. Register today.

IdeaScale Open Innovation Awards: What We’re Looking For

open innovation awards

image courtesy of seth waite via flickr

IdeaScale’s second annual Open Innovation Awards are live and taking submissions! We’re taking submissions in three categories: Best Engagement strategy, Best Moderation Strategy, and Best Innovation. Prizes include Apple iPad Minis, discounted 2015 IdeaScale subscriptions, and the chance to fast track a new, 2015 IdeaScale feature. So what are we looking for in submissions?

Unique Approaches – Approaching problems with new systems and ideas is what innovation is all about. How has your community approached its mission? From the questions and topics being tackled, to the community set-up, idea submission and nurture, and how information is relayed back to the community – tell us about the approach that made your campaign run.

Creativity – The IdeaScale Open Innovation Awards are a celebration of the innovating behind your campaign’s innovation. No two IdeaScale campaigns are ever the same. What makes your campaign unique? Tell us about your favorite aspect of your campaign – share the defining details.

New Tactics – How did you get your community to submit ideas? To vote and comment? How did you maintain levels of engagement? Share the behind-the-scenes work that went into making your campaign flourish.

Quantifiable Metrics – It’s okay, go ahead and brag – you’ve earned it. We’re looking for the full picture of your achievements. When you submit, share the metrics of your success.

Planning and executing an innovation campaign is a large undertaking in any industry. The IdeaScale Open Innovation Awards are your chance to share what you’ve learned and accomplished at your IdeaScale campaign with the innovation community. Submissions will be accepted until November 14th, 2014, but don’t wait – submit today.

Before Citizen Engagement

image curtesy of opensource.com via flickr

image courtesy of opensource.com via flickr

The most effective governments are those that built for and with the citizens. This requires that the government be in tune with the needs and opinions of its citizens, but also that the citizens be well-informed and granted easy access to the decisions of their government. Citizen Engagement is more than a trend, it’s the modern means of keeping the citizenry and the the state in tune.

In early democracies, states were small enough to allow for direct democracy. One of the three branches of Ancient Athenian government was made entirely of citizens. The Assembly held the power to make decisions on the function of its government. When the United States was a younger nation, meetings were held in New England town halls for the citizens to get up and speak their mind before decisions were made. To attend was a choice, and to speak was not required, but in both of these examples citizens willingly participated.

The label of democracy or republic is less significant than the line of communication between the government and the people. For a government to run smoothly, voting cannot occur as frequently as decisions are made, and most modern governments are too large for all of their citizens to gather in a town hall. Creating a channel from decision makers to the citizens they represent allows for transparency and builds trust, and serves as a real-time measure of public opinion.

Transparency and trust are crucial to maintaining a strong government. It’s no surprise that the establishment of a free press tends to coincide with large jumps in functionality and innovation within governments’ history. A free press represents an engaged citizenry. These knowledgeable members of society have more realistic impressions of what their government can do for them. They are more inclined to lend their time, resources, and knowledge to their government.

Citizen Engagement is a necessary tool in government innovation. Engaged, citizens who see their government clearly are most able to make the best decisions regarding policy and process. If you’d like to find out more about how to develop a citizen engagement program for your agency or department, join us on September 30th for a complimentary webinar, register now.

Department of Labor: Solving Problems and Raising Awareness with National Dialogues

DOL-b&wThe United States Department of Labor is a cabinet-level department of the U.S. federal government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, re- employment services, and more.

ePolicyWorks is a special initiative launched by the Department of Labor which empowers web- based policymaking that engages citizens in order to address barriers to employment for people with disabilities and foster employment success of those living with disabilities. The initiative is also the award-winning host of an important series of online dialogues that enable ODEP to enlist the public’s input on key policy issues related to the employment of people with disabilities by channeling the brainpower of federal partners, nonprofits, NGOs and other stakeholders. IdeaScale is the platform for collaboration.

The Department of Labor has hosted more than seven online dialogues utilizing the IdeaScale platform. Each dialogue lasts approximately four weeks and follows an adaptable seven-step process.

After launching seven dialogues, the team is proud to report:

-     This strategy has won the ePolicyworks team recognition from the Secretary of Labor as part of their Honor Awards for the Federal Partners in Transition National Online Dialogue Team.
-     Over 5,000 community members have generated more than 600 ideas and 13,000 votes across all the dialogues.
-     Every state in the US has been represented across the challenges.
-     That the dialogues have improved policy efficiency substantially. A process that has traditionally taken five-years has been collapsed into a single year.

To learn about how the national dialogues have impacted policy and for a deeper understanding of the seven steps for a successful national dialogue, download the case study here.

Innovating with COSTAR: Converting Ideas Into Business Plans

image curtesy of mike linksvayer via flickr

image courtesy of mike linksvayer via flickr

What happens when you have an idea, but what you need is a value proposition?

The process of nurturing an idea from its first inspiration into something that can be pitched in Silicon Valley requires planning, refinement, and careful consideration. Thankfully, the Enterprise Development Group is a team of expert thinkers, facilitators and trainers who have been consulting since 1986 who have also developed a template for businesses to refine their ideas. The template is called CO-STAR.

Join IdeaScale in this exclusive webinar that explores the CO-STAR approach from concept to execution with guest speakers from EDG and the BBC. The webinar will include

•  An overview of CO-STAR and its use in developing market-worthy ventures

•  A demonstration of CO-STAR within an innovation management program

•  A summary of how CO-STAR was applied at BBC

The webinar will include a live Q&A with the speakers. Join us and register for this complimentary webinar set to take place on Tuesday, October 21st at 9 a.m. PST today!

Speakers Include:

Herman Gyr, Founding Partner, EDG

Rob Hoehn, CEO, IdeaScale

Pat Younge, Former Chief Creative Officer, BBC

Successful Citizen Engagement Tuesday, September 30th, 1 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. EST

image curtesy of lee wright via flickr

image courtesy of lee wright via flickr

There is a growing trend of involving the crowd in public decision making. This practice has already been proven out in the private sector, where crowdsourcing has been used to solve longstanding issues, ranging from suggested feature improvements for mobile applications to reducing maternal mortality with technology.

The idea of involving the public isn’t new, But with the changing role of a public town hall, one has to ask “How can the engagement of the town meeting scale up from a couple thousand people standing in one location to many more than that?” or “How do you hear from the many people who can’t show up for meetings, but will show up to vote on election day and decide who’s doing a good job?”

To answer these questions, IdeaScale is offering a webinar on September 30, featuring Norm Jacknis, Director of Program Development, to review:

8 key reasons to engage citizens:

• Strategic things to consider to ensure a successful citizen dialogue
• Some interesting and thought provoking examples of citizen engagement
• The webinar will be followed by a live question and answer session.

Join us and register for this complimentary webinar today!

Change My World in One Minute

WCPD14_Logo_USA_HRRight now 17 million people around the world are living with Cerebral Palsy. Of the children living with CP:

      •  1 in 4 cannot talk
      •  1 in 3 cannot walk
      •  1 in 2 have an intellectual disability
      •  1 in 4 have epilepsy

It’s inconceivable, right? Not to the those 17 million, and not the 350 million people who are close to an adult or child with CP. That enormous crowd is at the base of the World Cerebral Palsy Day challenge: Change My World in One Minute.

This challenge has four stages, making it easy for anyone – hopefully everyone – to participate. The challenge is simple: submit a written or video, that takes a minute or less to watch or read, idea for how to improve the lives of people with CP.

      •  Stage 1: Idea Submission and Most Creative Prizes
Anyone can submit: those with CP, the people who know and love them, innovators and experts. Ideas are accepted through the end of October 2014. Apple iPads will be given out to the most innovative and creative ideas as spot prizes.

      •  Stage 2: Voting and People’s Choice Award
Voting begins October 1st and ends October 31st 2014. The participant whose idea gets the most votes in October will win the People’s Choice $500 Award.

      •  Step 3: Judging
A panel of experts made up of innovation specialists, individuals with CP and family members will review all submitted ideas. Their short list will be publicized on January 20th, 2015.

      •  Step 4: Invent It
Inventors, researchers and innovators are all welcomed to create prototypes and designs of solutions to the short listed ideas. Winners of the $30,000 prize pool are announced on July 20th, 2015.

This is the 3rd Change My World Challenge issued. In years past winners thought up a solar powered wheelchair – that was built during the Invent It! stage and a customizable walker – built for function AND style. Idea submission is already open, and drawing some great ideas already, including a portable ramp, a preschool revamped to meet the needs of kids with CP, and some really inventive mobility concepts.

Participation on any level will help make the lives of those with CP easier, and more fulfilling. An idea, a vote, or even a social media share for this event will increase awareness, and grow the crowd of innovators. A $10,000 prize will be awarded to the non-profit organization with the most clients, family members, staff, and allies participating.

So get in there and submit your best ideas. Don’t forget to celebrate World CP Day on October 1st by wearing green, spreading the world, and returning to the community to vote for the most innovative, most exciting, most life changing ideas.

The City of Atlanta Leveraging Its Most Valuable Resource – Its Employees

When Barack Obama took office five years ago, he launched the White House SAVE Award – a program that sought ideas from federal employees about how to make the government not only more effective, but also more efficient when it came to spending (hence its name: “Securing Americans Value and Efficiency”).

Every year, the President issues a call to employees asking them to share their ideas using IdeaScale technology. Every branch across the US participates in the conversation and votes on one another’s ideas. Then, the Office of Management and Budget narrows down the best ideas to a “final four” which can be viewed and voted on by the American public. The winner is granted the honor of presenting his or her idea to the President in Washington. It has been a hugely successful program that has generated millions of dollars of savings on an ongoing basis.

In 2013, the City of Atlanta followed suit and instituted a city-wide campaign that engaged all Atlantian employees in generating ideas that could reduce waste, cut red tape and save money on operations. The city launched the program with a gala celebration that instructed employees on how to use the tool followed by ongoing, city-wide communications to all employees via email that encouraged them to submit ideas. They even had an offline option for employees who didn’t have access to a computer as part of their daily routine at work.

The campaign was celebrated as a success. They generated hundreds of ideas and from those hundreds, twelve were flagged for implementation, and the top three alone were evaluated to amount to a potential cost savings of $7.1 million annually.

If you want to learn more about the City of Atlanta’s crowdsourcing success, download the case study here.

Announcing the Second Annual Open Innovation Awards

For the second year in a row IdeaScale is hosting a competition among innovators: The Open Innovation Awards. This annual contest is a way to honor the IdeaScale communities that demonstrate their exceptional innovation best practices.

The specific rules and eligibility are posted at ideascale.com/innovation-award, but the contest is open to IdeaScale members, administrators, and moderators that can demonstrate a community’s expertise in the areas of engagement, moderation, or delivery.

All entrees are due by November 14th, 2014 and must be submitted online with the application completed in a single sitting. For an advance copy of all application questions, contact jessica.day@ideascale.com. Finalists will be selected by December. Final winners will be announced before the holidays in mid-December.

Winners will receive an Apple iPad Mini, a discount on their 2015 IdeaScale subscription and a stylized and shareable press packet. All winners will also have the ability to fast track an IdeaScale feature for 2015 and be able to activate one of the higher-end features free of charge.

And if you’re interested in seeing more from last year’s winners, check out their stories here:

    •  Yale
    •  Marriott
    •  UNCW
    •  State of Minnesota
    •  The Cerebral Palsy Alliance

If you’d like to nominate a community to become a winner in this year’s IdeaScale Open Innovation Awards, please visit our site!

Collaborative Crime Fighting: the Department’s Most Powerful Weapon

photo curtesy of ian britton via flick

photo courtesy of ian britton via flickr

Information travels faster now than ever before, and you don’t have to be an AARP member to notice the change. According to Pew Research, 87% of adults in the United States use the internet. When seeking community news and information, they have countless sources to tap into – from social media to government run websites. For Law Enforcement, the challenge becomes, how to keep the citizens safe and informed, when competing with these sources.

This modern quandary has a modern solution based off an old concept: Crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing comes from the private sector, but has proven useful in government innovation, citizen engagement, and keeping departments and agencies current. Crowdsourcing is a way to both connect to a large community efficiently, and to leverage their knowledge for problem solving. Creating and maintaining an online source for citizens to access the most current information about safety and law enforcement in their town empowers the community, and strengthens the force.

Foster Transparency The local community will stay apprised of the work law enforcement is doing one way or another. Departments that maintain a channel to share this information with the public are able to keep their citizens accurately informed.

Build Trust Not all law enforcement departments are trusted. Many have lost the faith of their community through real and perceived missteps. Trust can be regained by including the citizens in the work of keeping their streets safe. Government agencies at all levels utilize citizen engagement to strengthen trust, solve problems, and keep citizens informed. Police departments can benefit from the practice for all of the same reasons. By being included in the decision making process from the early stages, citizens become more likely to pay their taxes (Democracy Spot).

Community Policing This network of engaged citizens are now an asset. The New South Wales Police Force connected found that working with their community to solve crimes boosted information brought in about crimes by 20% (IACP). In a year and a half the Philadelphia Police Department made over 100 arrests based on help from their community. The PPD posts the information they have to an online source, and asks citizens for help (IACP).