Spotlight on IdeaScale

It’s been a busy time for IdeaScale. We’ve launched BadgeFarm, we’ve been following up on the success of the Federal Mobility Strategy, launching the new initiative on Section 508, and loads of other behind-the-scenes stuff that you’ll have to look forward to in the coming weeks. But we’ve also been in-front-of-the-scenes as well and we just wanted to share some of the news.

Last month, Software Advice blog listed IdeaScale as one of their favorite customer service applications. Why? Because IdeaScale’s available for any mobile platform and not only helps assemble customer feedback, but also helps to prioritize it. It appeared in good company among other mobile feedback platforms including Tello and Gripe.

But IdeaScale wasn’t highlighted simply for its mobile and customer service capabilities, it was also highlighted in an interview addressing a new study by the University of Illinois which ranked the social media sophistication of various U.S. cities. While Chicago used to rank number 8, it now ranks at number 17 and in a discussion of that fall in rank, they talked about how that change is not so much because Chicago has fallen behind, but that other cities have caught up. They also talk about how some of the leading social media cities (among them Seattle) go beyond simply using Facebook and Twitter (and there are still some cities that haven’t done even that), which was praised for its use of the platform IdeaScale that allows users to submit and rate ideas for improving local government.

More than anything, however, these stories signal a sea change in industry trends. Customer feedback is now a mobile imperative and that feedback needs to be an integrated part of the user experience that doesn’t take the user away from the application that they are engaging in. Cities and governments need to catch up to their citizens – they need to be asking for their thoughts and suggestions at every turn: on Facebook and Twitter, in organized websites, and in crowdsourcing platforms like IdeaScale.

What other changes does this signal in the industry? What does this mean for the future of crowdsourcing and network intelligence?

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s